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20121101
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of the time. >> california's governor called it quackery because he is and he helped ban it which it should be. now the crackdown may go nationwide. yesterday, california congresswoman jackie spear announced a nonbinding resolution to encourage each state to make the same move that california did. it's called the shock revolution. shock is for stop harming our kids. some kids explain what the therapy did to them. >> i am telling my story now in hopes that others will speak out to put an end to this sham. the ex-gay industry did nothing but provide me and my family with false lies mass ka raiding as science. >> representative jackie spear joins me now live from capitol hill. congresswoman, thank you so much for joining us. my first question to you, why not just introduce legislation to ban it? why the nonbinding resolution? >> it is a state function to regulate professions, so it is incumbent on the states to look at the scope of practice within professions and determine whether certain practices are appropriate or not. the american psychological association and the american psychiatric associa
people into jobs that are opening. there's a reason san diego, california is the human genome capital of the world. same deal, public, private, foundations, people working together. ever since the tea party took over the republican party -- >> boo! >> ever since the tea party took over the republican party, they say it's my way or the highway, we're right all the time. they've beat the distinguished republican senator from indiana, richard luger, their most important foreign policy spokesperson because he was attacked by his opponent for cooperating with president obama on national security. they're nominee actually said, i couldn't make this up, that his happiest day was when he was imposing his opinion on someone else and he wanted the people to send him to washington, so that he could have more partisanship in washington, d.c. now if you want it, you can have it. the people of indiana don't want it, congressman joe donnelly his opponent was ahead by 11 points in the most recent polls, you're going to change that. but it will all be for naught if you reward him by not electing presi
wade into this issue, one of the cases they can hear is the appeal of california's prop 8, the ballot metro that bans same-sex marriage. what's at stake? is. >> the first word is if, and so you have to reiterate that we don't know if that decision to take up this case is going to come today or even this term. it could and it might, and there's speculation that it will, but if the supreme court has anything, it's unpredictable, and on the proposition 8 case, there's a specific question. can a state referendum abolish same-sex marriage after the courts have already ruled that it's legal? remember, that statewide vote to ban gay marriage was in response to courts in california legalizing same-sex marriage. assuming the supreme court sticks to this specific issue, it would have big implications for, say, california, but wouldn't necessarily be a sweeping ruling that would impact same-sex marriage all over the country. >> joe, talk a little bit about these cases that are challenging the federal defense of marriage act, known as doma. this is essentially the law that defines marriage betwee
and massachusetts into play. democrats are trying hard to unseat gop incumbents in blue states like california, new york, and illinois. and could see gains in maryland and florida. so why do these house races matter? members of congress will have to make big decisions in the coming month. chief among them, reaching a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, a series of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect next year. >> the decisions confronting congress over the next four months are bigger than i think most of us have seen in our lifetime, at least on the fiscal matter. >> it's not just the fiscal cliff. >> most people think we need fundamental tax reform, cuts in spending and entitlement reform. there's no indication the new congress will be willing to do that either short-term in the lame duck or longer term. >> so the forecast for the next congress, more of the same. athena jones, cnn, washington. >> and we have more on the race to the white house. first lady michelle obama is expected to speak any minute now in southern ohio. you're looking at live pictures right now. looks like
california. he's used to hearing from the public. but when he posted a picture on facebook, he and his wife were overwhelmed. >> it kept going and going and going. >> i think hit a racial cord. i think it hit a father/daughter court. >> reporter: the summervilles adopted calle, a decision that raised tough questions about themselves. >> we also thought, you know, there is a baby out there that needs a mommy and a daddy. if we all of a sudden back out because we are scared that this happens to be a black baby, what does that say about us? >> reporter: they cherish watching calle's play time with older city sydney, but know as calle gets older, there will likely be challenges. racial adoptees can experience a lack of cultural identity. >> we dealt with it. my mom always turned everything that was an obstacle into confidence. >> reporter: facing identity issues head on helped world renowned chef marcus samuelsson. he's ethiopian, adopted by swedish parents. >> don't be naive about the questions that are going to come, like race has a place. >> reporter: brought up with a strong sense of self,
it goes without saying. the president will carry new york and california. mitt romney will carry texas. those states are not in play right now so it's in terms of an immediate impact but the battleground states, widely admired. people that don't like necessarily democrats or republicans, they look to see who's the best candidate and i think michael bloomberg has sway potentially. if it's a close race in ohio, virginia or nevada, maybe anything could have an impact on swaying final undecided voters and bloomberg could have an impact, not a huge impact. i think you're right on that matter but anything could have an impact. >> we thank you. see you at the top of the hour for "the situation room." i want to get back to the aftermath of sandy. we have seen, you have seen the absolute destruction over a couple of days that nothing more shocking than the pictures from breezy point, new york. look at this. where not just the floodwaters but fire has consumed home after home after home. more than 100 before the fire stopped and when you look at the images, can you imagine staying in your home a
of los angeles, not your home state of california, but still, you're there. i want to talk to you about the lines. these lines of early voters we're seeing today, looks like winding around street corners, you have people in southern florida, casting ballots, waiting for hours to do so, some from what i've heard, some are just walking away, giving up. question to you is how confident are you by the time the polls close tomorrow that everyone who wants to vote can? >> well, as you know, the governor, governor scott and the legislature reduced early voting by six days. they even fought in court the opportunity to extend voting hours at a polling place where there had been a bomb threat. our hope is that people will go out and vote. i can tell you there are 125 offices. we have been working two years here in florida. >> what is your confidence level? are you confident that everyone who wants to vote will be voting? >> i'm confident that we'll make every effort to get them out to vote. you talked about the enthusiasm gap. i haven't seen it. i didn't see it in tampa. i haven't seen it in miam
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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